Practice Areas

Immigration Advisory and FAQs


For the latest updates, please visit our recent news section.

The general information provided below is not intended to serve as a source of legal advice for any purpose. Please contact your designated Gibney representative or immigration counsel for specific legal advice.

Advisory

Updates on Trump Executive Actions on Immigration
March 23, 2017

The Trump administration has issued a number of Executive Orders impacting immigration law, policy and procedures. Executive Orders are published on the White House website.

Federal Courts Hinder Administration Efforts to Restrict Travel 

Federal courts have blocked attempts by the Trump administration to restrict entry to the U.S. by nationals from designated countries and refugees.

On March 6, 2017, the Trump Administration issued a new Executive Order which was intended to take effect on March 16, 2017 suspending entry of certain foreign nationals of six (6) countries including Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen for at least 90 days and all refugees for at least 120 days. On March 15, 2017, Federal District Courts in Hawaii and Maryland granted temporary restraining orders preventing implementation of the two key provisions.

The new Executive Order is more limited in scope and revokes the earlier Executive Order issued on January 27, 2017, which was suspended through a Temporary Restraining Order issued by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals (State of Washington and State of Minnesota v. Trump). The Administration also issued a new Memorandum to provide guidance for the U.S. Secretary of State, the Attorney General, and the Secretary of Homeland Security on its implementation. Provisions call for increased scrutiny of all foreign nationals applying for entry, visa issuance or other immigration benefits.

The State Department also issued a series of internal cables on implementing “extreme vetting” measures. Directives call for officials to broaden the scope of those subject to security clearances, and expand information collection including requests for all phone numbers, emails and social media handles used by visa applicants in the past five years and social media history for those who have ever been present in ISIS controlled territory.

Many of these enhanced security protocols have not taken effect and are awaiting further authorization. Additional screening or security protocols at consulates and USCIS may ultimately impact processing timelines of all applications.

Those applying for visas at consulate outside the U.S. are advised to contact immigration counsel for specific legal advice. We will continue to monitor the impact of recent Executive Orders as agencies, border officers and consulates implement the new rules and policies.

Key Provisions of the New Executive Order Issued March 6, 2017:

Enhanced Screening and Security Protocols: Directing agencies to implement additional screening standards and protocols for refugees and other foreign nationals seeking U.S. entry, visa issuance, and immigration benefits and to report on their efforts.

Suspension of Entry to U.S. by Nationals of Designated Countries: Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, or Yemen. The order suspends the entry of nationals of the designated countries – by birth or citizenship – for at least 90 days starting March 16, 2017.

  • Exemptions
    Nationals of the designated countries in following categories are not subject to the entry ban:

    • U.S. citizens traveling with a U.S. passport;
    • Lawful permanent residents (“green card” holders);
    • Dual nationals including using the passport from a non-designated country;
    • Diplomats;
    • Persons already granted asylum, refugees already admitted to the United States and individuals granted withholding of removal, advance parole or protection under Convention Against Torture; and
    • Persons applying for entry to the U.S. pursuant to a valid visa obtained prior to March 16, 2017.
  • Waivers
    The new Executive Order also provided for limited discretionary waivers to be evaluated on a “case-by-case” basis. Officers at the port of entry and consular officers may issue visas or allow entry of a national subject to the ban if the foreign national has demonstrated to the officer’s satisfaction that denying entry during the suspension period would cause undue hardship, entry would not pose a threat to national security and would be in the national interest. Section 3(c) of the order provides examples of circumstances where a waiver may be appropriate.

Suspension of All Refugee Admissions: The new Executive Order suspends admission and adjudication of applications by refugees into the United States under the United States Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP) for 120 days. The new order no longer singles out Syria and no longer prioritizes refugee claims based on individuals of a “minority religion.”

Suspension of the Visa Interview Waiver Program: The new order requires those applying for visas at U.S. consulates to attend an in-person visa interview.

For the full text of the order click here.

Travel Precautions:
Due to uncertainties surrounding implementation of this new Executive Order, foreign nationals who may be impacted by the order should contact immigration counsel prior to departing the U.S. or making plans to enter the U.S. or apply for a visa. Travelers subject to the ban currently outside the U.S. should contact immigration counsel immediately and consider return to the U.S. prior to the effective date of March 16, 2017.

Since the release of the initial Executive Order, individuals have reported inconsistent application of rules, being denied entry onto international flights, extended wait times at U.S. Ports of Entry due to extra screening, as well as hours of detention and intrusive questioning (including separating family members and reviewing cell phones, laptops, and social media accounts) without allowing access to legal counsel. All travelers and visa applicants may be subject to increased scrutiny or delays.

Please contact immigration counsel for specific legal advice on your case.

On January 25, 2017, the administration issued two other orders.

The Executive Order: Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States, included the following provisions:

  • “Enforcement Priorities” include the removal of those who have been charged with or convicted of any crime or who “in the judgment of an immigration officer, otherwise pose a risk to public safety or national security”
  • Sanctuary Cities – stated policy to “ensure that jurisdictions that fail to comply with applicable Federal law do not receive Federal funds, except as mandated by law”

Note: Last year, Dept. of State began enforcing new policy on visa revocations for those with DUI charges; for more information, see our alert.

Foreign nationals with prior security or criminal issues should consult with immigration counsel before traveling or applying for immigration benefits. This includes but is not limited to foreign nationals who have been arrested, charged or convicted of any crime (even if case dismissed), who have had prior visa denials or security clearance/administrative processing, or who have been previously detained at the port of entry.

The Executive Order: Border Security and Immigration Enforcement Improvements, included the following provisions:

  • Directive to immediately plan and construct a physical wall along the southern border
  • Expand authority and facilities for detention of those who violate immigration laws

Actions being taken by federal agencies to implement these orders are uncertain, subject to change and likely to be challenged in the courts.

All foreign nationals traveling to the U.S. may be subject to increased scrutiny and delays at consulates and ports of entry as a result of the executive order. The recent changes have significantly impacted immigration agency adjudications and there have been reports of inconsistent application of laws and policy by government officials and agencies.

Please contact your designated Gibney representative or immigration counsel for specific legal advice.

Top


FAQs

FAQs (last updated March 7, 2017):

For the most recent updates, visit our news page.

General Information on Immigration Policy Changes and Travel

Q1: Where can I find the latest government notices?
Please visit Gibney’s Useful Links for general information available on U.S. federal government websites and other sources.  The information changes frequently.  Some government websites may not be updated and/or may conflict with rules or policies being applied in practice at other agencies, consulates and ports of entry to the U.S.  Please contact immigration counsel for specific legal advice on your case.

Q2:  What documents should foreign nationals carry while in the United States and traveling domestically?
All travelers, including U.S. citizens, should carry a government issued identification card (e.g.  a driver’s license) which is typically accepted on domestic flights as proof of identification.  Check with your carrier for list of acceptable documents.  If requested by officers, all non-citizens should be prepared to present evidence of immigration status in the U.S.  Lawful permanent residents are required to carry their green card, and temporary visitors should be prepared to present a passport, current I-94, and/or other evidence of status.  Note:  Many foreign nationals with a valid unexpired I-94 may not require a valid visa stamp for domestic travel within the United States, but do require a valid visa stamp if entering the U.S. from abroad.  Different and/or additional documents may be required for international travel.    Please contact immigration counsel for specific legal advice and/or information regarding documentation required for international travel and re-entry to the U.S. from abroad.

New Executive Order Effective March 16 Restricting Entry of Nationals from Designated Countries

Q1: What is the impact of the new Executive Order signed on March 6, 2017? 

Effective March 16, 2017, the new Executive Order revokes and replaces the original Executive Order issued January 27, 2017, which was suspended pursuant to a Temporary Restraining Order issued by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in State of Washington and State of Minnesota v. Trump. Key provisions of the new order include:

  • Directing agencies to implement additional screening standards for foreign nationals seeking U.S. entry, visa issuance, and immigration benefits and report on their efforts;
  • Restrictions on entry, visa issuance and immigration benefits for nationals – by birth or citizenship – of “designated countries”;
  • Suspension of the U.S. refugee admissions program for 120 days (for all countries) and limiting total number of refugee admissions; and
  • Suspension of the Visa Interview Waiver Program, requiring all visa applicants to apply for visas in person.

For the full text of the order, please visit the White House website. Department of Homeland Security has also released series of Questions & Answers.

Q2: What are the “designated countries” subject to restrictions on entry? 

Designated countries subject to the travel restrictions under the Executive Order include Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. Note: The administration is evaluating additional countries. These may be added to list of designated countries or subject to restrictions on entry to the U.S. without notice.

In the new order, Iraq was removed from the list of designated countries subject to the ban on entry. However, nationals of Iraq will be subject to additional inquiries and security clearances which may restrict or significantly delay travel to the U.S.

Q3: What do the Executive Orders mean for nationals of one of the designated countries? 

Nationals of one of the designated countries – by birth or citizenship – will be barred from entry to the U.S. for at least 90 days starting March 16, 2017, unless they qualify under an exemption or an officer approves a waiver.

Exemptions
Nationals of the designated countries in following categories are not subject to the restrictions:

  • U.S. citizens;
  • Lawful permanent residents (“green card” holders);
  • Dual nationals using the passport from a non-designated country;
  • Diplomats;
  • Persons already granted asylum, refugees already admitted to the United States and individual granted withholding of removal, advance parole or protection under Convention Against Torture; and
  • Persons applying for entry to the U.S. pursuant to a valid visa obtained prior to the effective date of March 16, 2017.

Waivers
The new Executive Order also provided for limited discretionary waivers to be evaluated on a “case-by-case” basis. Officers at the port of entry and consular officers may issue visas or allow entry of a national subject to the ban if the foreign national has demonstrated to the officer’s satisfaction that denying entry during the suspension period would cause undue hardship, entry would not pose a threat to

national security and would be in the national interest. Section 3(c) of the order provides examples of circumstances where a waiver may be appropriate.

Due to uncertainties surrounding implementation of this new Executive Order, foreign nationals who may be impacted should contact immigration counsel prior to departing the U.S. or making plans to enter the U.S. or apply for a visa. Travelers subject to the ban currently outside the U.S. should contact immigration counsel immediately and consider return to the U.S. prior to the effective date of March 16, 2017.

There are significant risks associated with international travel if you are from or have traveled to one of the designated countries or any other country reported to be of potential concern. Please contact your immigration counsel or Gibney representative for specific legal advice.

Q4: What does the order mean for U.S. citizens originally from one of the designated countries? 

U.S. citizens are not subject to the ban. U.S. citizens should be admitted, but may be subject to additional scrutiny and questioning when entering the U.S.

Q5: What is the impact on nationals of one of the designated countries who are lawful permanent residents (with a valid green card) or lawful temporary residents with a valid visa? 

U.S. permanent residents (i.e. green card holders) and those with valid visas issued by a U.S. consulate before March 16, 2017 should be admitted to the U.S. but may be subject to additional scrutiny and questioning.

Recent reports suggest that delays and detention at U.S. ports of entry may last several hours and travelers should be prepared to have personal effects (luggage, cell phone, laptop, social media accounts, etc.) reviewed by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and/or Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials. You may be separated from your family members and you may not have access to legal counsel. Nationals of other predominantly Muslim countries may also be subject to detention and additional scrutiny on return to the U.S., even without an Executive Order pertaining to one of these countries. Permanent residents should avoid signing any waivers of their rights without consultation with immigration counsel.

Non-immigrants with temporary status in the U.S. are advised to consult with immigration counsel prior to departing from the U.S. or applying for renewal of an expired visa at a consulate abroad.

Q6: What is the impact on non-citizens who are NOT nationals of a designated country but who have traveled to one of the designated countries? 

The Executive Order does not address this specific point. However, foreign nationals who have traveled to one of the designated countries may be detained on a case-by-case basis and questioned by CBP about travel upon re-entry to the U.S. Detention may last several hours and travelers should be prepared to have your personal effects (luggage, cell phone, laptop, social media accounts, etc.) reviewed by CBP and/or ICE officials. Travelers may be separated from your family members and you may not have access to legal counsel.

In addition, those who have traveled to or been present in Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, or Yemen on or after March 1, 2011 (with limited exceptions) are no longer eligible for travel under the Visa Waiver program and must apply for a visa at a consulate abroad. Please visit the Department of State website for additional information on Visa Waiver travel.

When submitting a visa application form (i.e. Form DS-160), travelers must disclose any international travel and travel to any of the listed countries may trigger additional questions and delay visa issuance.

If you have any concerns, please check with your designated Gibney representative.

Q7: Will the order impact families of principal U.S. visa holders sponsored by employers if family members are from one of the designated countries? 

Yes. Family members on visas who are nationals of one of the designated countries are impacted directly as outlined above and should obtain advice legal advice prior to travel.

Q8: What is the impact on international travel or immigration processing generally? 

All travelers should expect delays at ports of entry into the U.S. In addition, the Executive Order eliminated procedures to waive interviews for applicants renewing their visas at the U.S. consulates abroad. As a result, consular workloads are expected to increase, resulting in delays in visa processing and visa issuance. Additional security measures may also be implemented, increasing visa processing times. Finally, the federal government is currently subject to a hiring freeze, and additional resources are not likely to be added to meet the increased workloads. Processing times for all applications are expected to increase.

For additional information, please visit our Useful Links here.

Please contact immigration counsel for specific legal advice on your case.

If you have any queries not covered by the above FAQs, please contact your designated Gibney representative for further information. We will be continuously updating these FAQs as more information becomes available.

This website contains general information about Gibney, Anthony & Flaherty, LLP and is not intended to serve as a source of legal advice for any purpose. Neither receipt of information presented on this site nor any email or other electronic communication sent to Gibney, Anthony & Flaherty, LLP or its lawyers through this site will create an attorney-client relationship, and no such email or communication will be treated as confidential. No user of this site should act or refrain from acting on the basis of information on this site without seeking legal advice from counsel in the relevant jurisdiction. Gibney, Anthony & Flaherty, LLP expressly disclaims liability with respect to actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this site. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

Top


White House http://www.whitehouse.gov

U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) www.dhs.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) www.uscis.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) www.cbp.gov

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) www.ice.gov

U.S. Department of State (DOS) www.travel.state.gov

U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) www.dol.gov

U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) www.ssa.gov

Internal Revenue Service (IRS) www.irs.gov

Non-Governmental Organizations with news and information regarding immigrant rights:

American Immigration Council  www.americanimmigrationcouncil.org

American Civil Liberties Union www.aclu.org

Recent News

Top


Recent News Posts


Immigration Alert: Federal Court Blocks Latest Executive Order on Immigration

On March 15, 2017, a Federal District Court in Hawaii granted a temporary restraining order preventing implementation of the two key provisions of the latest Executive Order impacting immigration, which was intended to go into effect on March 16th.  The court order halts implementation of Section 2 of the order regarding suspension of entry by
Read More

Immigration Alert: New Executive Order on U.S. Immigration Effective March 16

On Monday, March 6, 2017, the Trump Administration issued a new Executive Order which will take effect on March 16, 2017 suspending entry of certain foreign nationals of six (6) countries including Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen for at least 90 days, subject to exemptions and waivers outlined below. The order also suspends
Read More

Immigration Alert: Premium Processing Suspended For All H-1B Petitions Starting April 3rd

Starting April 3rd, 2017, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will temporarily suspend Premium Processing for all H-1B petitions for a period of up to six months. The USCIS’s goal is to reduce overall H-1B processing times and prioritize adjudication of long-pending petitions. Background on Premium Processing: H-1B petitions filed under the regular processing
Read More

Update on Trump Administration Executive Orders on U.S. Immigration: Court Upholds TRO – Maintains Halt on Travel/Refugee Ban

The Trump Administration’s Executive Order on immigration remains on hold after an appeals court denied an emergency motion by the government to reinstate it. The Executive Order issued on January 27, 2017, sought to suspend entry of nationals from seven (7) countries including Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen for at least 90
Read More

Update on Trump Administration Executive Orders on U.S. Immigration: Court Issues TRO – Halts Travel/Refugee Ban

On Friday, January 27, 2017, the Trump administration issued an Executive Order suspending entry of nationals from seven (7) countries including Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen for at least 90 days, and suspending admittance of all refugees for at least 120 days. Since the Executive Order was signed, U.S. government agencies have issued various
Read More